Race Report October to December 2021

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Yorkshire 10-mile

17th October 2021

Race report by Leon Stringer

An early morning drive over the Pennines to York for this 10-mile race. Fortunately, the rain that had poured all morning eased off and stopped for the race itself. The park and ride for race day was at a disused airfield next to an aviation museum, so you drive past a Victor, a Nimrod, and other classic aircraft (I know at least one Harrier who will be interested!). Race HQ is at the University of York’s campus. The start of the race loops into the city walls and past York Minster before heading out into the countryside. There were two moderate climbs (one near the end) but it was a fairly flat course, all on roads.

Harriers:
Leon Stringer 01:15:15 (chip time) 186th out of 1914 runners PB

North Staffs Cross Country League – stafford common

16th October 2021

Female Results

 

Pos
Name
AG
Time
44
Sarah DiCesere
FSen
23:34
54
Stella Denniss
F45
24:09
75
Chris Skellern
F55
25:51
81
Vanessa Welham
FSen
26:31
90
Caitlin Mills
FSen
27:19
109
Kerri Delaney
FSen
28:37
111
Ruth Edwards
F60
28:54
115
Jo Oliver
F50
29:21
139
Julie Nokes
F60
33:14

 

Male Results

 

Pos.
Name
AG
Time
48
Phil Hilsdon
M40
29:51
57
Mark Silvester
MSen
30:25
70
Justin Green
M45
31:06
82
Jake Oliver
M20
32:06
91
Christopher Seale
MSen
32:50
94
Michael Dobson
M55
32:54
108
Dan Findlay-Robinson
M40
33:38
113
Rhys McDowell
MSen
34:08
118
Jason Littlewood
MSen
34:23
119
Adam Lightfoot
M40
34:23
120
Ian Hodkinson
M50
34:29
125
Ian Wood
M50
35:00
131
Nitesh Thakrar
M60
35:25
133
Al Langford
MSen
36:06
149
Richard Booth
M45
38:11
159
Mark Oliver
M50
39:53
160
Roy Clay
M65
40:30

 

manchester marathon

10th October 2021

A great Harriers turn out. No PB’s this time however 12 people were taking part in their first marathon.

Photos from Facebook.

 

Overall Position
Name
Chiptime
Category
Category Position
Gender
Gender Position
First Marathon
247
Tom Chell
02:53:35
MSEN
178
m
242
Yes
1623
Liam Duggan
03:22:48
MSEN
965
m
1522
Yes
4169
Richard Crump
03:51:39
MSEN
2181
m
3642
Yes
5149
Marie Larivoire
03:59:19
FSEN
489
f
766
Yes
5179
Antonio Treglia
03:59:31
MSEN
2622
m
4403
Yes
6034
Nitesh Thakrar
04:08:37
MV60
88
m
5003
Yes
8392
Ruth Edwards
04:31:39
FV60
23
f
1796
 
9268
Karen Murray
04:41:23
FV55
84
f
2115
 
9643
Kerri Delaney
04:46:03
FSEN
1258
f
2237
Yes
10297
Lindsey Foster
04:54:22
FV55
105
f
2486
 
11322
Tom Davall
05:09:09
MSEN
4816
m
8383
Yes
11323
Suzanne Brotherhood
05:09:11
FV50
279
f
2940
Yes
11494
Mark Jones
05:12:36
MV50
797
m
8490
Yes
11495
Tracy Burrows
05:12:37
FV45
496
f
3005
Yes
12408
Sarah Bromley
05:35:00
FV45
565
f
3417
Yes
12412
Simon Bromley
05:35:03
MV45
1201
m
8993
 

Race Report by Simon Bromley

One week after London, still on a high (and still feeling it in the legs) I’m travelling up to Manchester for my second Marathon in a week. But this time, I’m not running for myself. The lovely Wife, Mrs B, is running her first ever Marathon.
Unlike London, race numbers were posted out, so we had them in plenty of time ready for the big day, but again, arrival and start times to prevent a mass start.
This event saw more Harriers running. I think there were about 12 Harriers in total, Sue Jones, Suzanne Brotherhood, Tracy Burrows, Nitesh Thacker to name but a few.
The evening before a big group of Harriers invades Manchester to finish Carb loading at a local Italian restaurant. With a hearty meal and some race day appropriate fluids (a couple of beers and some wine) we head back to our respective hotels for a good night’s sleep, although I’m sure that for some they didn’t sleep as well as they wanted to.
Race day morning. Heading down to breakfast, debating whether a full English is suitable as a pre-race breakfast but watching Mrs B struggling to eat her bowl of cornflakes.
Having decided not to have copious amounts of Bacon, sausage, and Egg. We head out of the hotel to the local Metrolink for the short trip to Old Trafford and get ready for the off. Walking from the metro station there are other runners going past on the course, completing the Manchester Half, being held on the same day. Down past the finish line and over to the bag drop in the athlete’s village and then out of the back gate and taking that walk towards the start line.
Runners planned in various waves all waiting to be called forward for a 5-minute walk towards the start. Held in a starting pen just before the start line, each group in each wave gets lead to the line, the starter holds a pistol in the air and sets us off running.
Mrs B and I set off, keeping a close on the pace to make sure that she doesn’t go off too quick and pay for it later we pass the marker for the first mile. One thing I noticed on my way to the floor was that there are a lot of potholes in the street of Manchester. Fortunately, my fall was not a disaster and rolling like a skilled professional, I was back on my feet, bravely soldiering on. I didn’t even complain about the small (but very painful) cut on my hand.
We push on through the miles. The level of support was well received. Although the crowds were not massive, those that turned out made up for it. Around the course, there were bands playing, DJ’s with music blaring from huge speaker systems which really added to the atmosphere. The run from Manchester towards Altrincham along a dual carriageway was tough. Not many people were out on the course and a road that seemed to go on forever. However, we got there. It was here that we questioned the description of the event where there was the use of the word ‘flat’ It seemed to me that the course in this part was more undulating than flat and in some parts I’m sure there was a Sherpa sat at the side of the road.
Once through Altrincham, however, it was back down the other side of the dual carriageway and making the push back towards Manchester and the last 10 miles to go. Mrs B struggling at this point. Those hills really took it out of her legs. Even though it was becoming harder, once I pointed out that we were into single figures miles, it did give her a new lease of life and gradually she began to realise that all those people who get swept up at the start and went off way to quick, we were slowly catching and passing.
The final 10k was upon us before we knew it. The strategy of counting down the feed stations was close to an end. Only two more to go before the final leg to the home stretch. Getting sick of gels, we started grabbing the jelly sweets being passed out by the crowds and they made a welcome change. The final water station comes into sight and then not far after the mile 25 marker. A smile on her face knowing that she is soon to complete her first marathon helped spur Mrs B onto the final stretch. Heading down the finish straight, dropping back to let Mrs B finish on her own, she definitely earned her medal, and she didn’t swear at me once all the way around.
It was funny though watching her walk through the athlete’s village and she’s still struggling with stairs 2 days later.

 

Chester Marathon

3rd October 2021

Mark Silvester 3.06.17 (First timer)
John Scott 3.21.14 (PB)
Chris Seale 3.42.20 (First timer)

market drayton 10k

3rd October 2021

ChipPos
Num
Name
Cat
(Cat/Pos)
ChipTime
 
251
2388
Ian Williams
M50
(031/091)
00:48:48
 
267
406
Richard Booth
M45
(034/096)
00:49:17
 
569
1335
Vasu Krishnan
M40
(053/077)
00:56:56
 
583
2117
Elizabeth Stork
FS
(032/096)
00:57:40
PB
1001
914
Dawn Gibbons
F45
(076/109)
01:08:44
 
1093
958
Sarah Gray
F60
(024/026)
01:13:23
 
1094
1825
Jo Probyn
F45
(090/109)
01:13:23
 

 

congleton Half

3rd October 2021

Pos
Name
M/F
AG
NSRRA
Chip Time
Gun Time
77
Spencer Holland
65th
9th
C
1:44:39
1:44:52
116
Antonio Treglia
87th
16th
C
1:50:55
1:51:29
259
Julie Nokes
100th
5th
W
2:26:40
2:27:21
262
Nitesh Thakrar
159th
11th
E
2:29:07
2:29:48

 

London marathon 2021

3rd October 2021

Well done for Harriers that took part in the London marathon 2021

 

Place (Overall)
Place (Gender)
Place (Category)
Name
Runner Number
Category
Half
Finish
 
2089
1987
454
Phil Hilsdon
25635
40-44
01:29:19
02:59:50
 
10613
8082
856
Justin Green
6882
50-54
01:57:08
03:52:56
 
14232
10456
4828
Jason Littlewood
21171
18-39
01:52:00
04:07:59
PB
16415
11840
1789
Simon Bromley
7956
45-49
02:01:47
04:21:27
 
28845
10213
1107
Mel Deakin
4814
50-54
02:13:38
05:20:32
 

Race Report by Simon Bromley

o, cast your mind back to a usual damp February.

I’m sat at my desk at work enjoying one of those rather exciting conference calls that many of us enjoy when my phone lights up with an email notification. Seeing that it’s about the Ballot draw for London, I open the email excitedly to see what training top I’d be sent this year as recompense for not getting drawn from the hat again.

But to my surprise, I see a happy grinning face with the words ”you’re in”, emblazoned across the banner headline. I’m so excited that a little bit of wee came out. After only five years of trying I’m successful in securing a place in my second of the ‘big six’ major marathons.

Thoughts turn to how to build a marathon training plan into an already packed training schedule for the Stafford Ironman……

Shift forward to October. A couple of months after Ironman, heading down to London after being really lazy since July and doing literally no training to get up to Marathon distance, I’m heading to the Marathon Expo to pick up my race number. Different this year thanks to Covid. I have to drop off everything I want at the finish line in my kit bag, prove I don’t have Covid by showing my results from a negative Covid test and then head into the main hall to collect race number.

Race Day. Heading down to my start line at Blackheath, sat on the train surround by other runners all heading in the same direction. The train stops at a station on the way to pick up more people, looking over at the platform to se the faces of so many people and one sticks out immediately, Phil Hilsdon, smiling at me through the window. He jumps on and we both make our way down towards the start pens.

We arrive at the common in Blackheath, surrounded by many others all heading through security (proving once again that we don’t have Covid-19) and make our way over towards the various starting areas. Everyone this year had been given times to arrive at start pens and specific start times. We find another familiar face in the crowd (well, after I rang him to see where he was) Jason Littlewood heads over and the three of us stand around waiting for the call to make our way into the pen. Phil goes first, then Jason and finally me. Stood waiting for the Marshalls to walk us all up to the start line, I noticed that I seemed to be one of very few club vests in the pen. Nearly every runner was wearing a charity vest. This amazing event raises so much money for charities across the UK that it’s easy to forget they all suffered during the pandemic due to some of their biggest fundraising activities being postponed or cancelled.

We are walked up to the start. The marshals move to one side and the claxon sounds and wave 6 starting at 10am is off and running. To be fair, the start is not all that impressive. You head out through a normal suburban part of London, through streets lined with people all cheering each and every person onwards. Things are going well, heading out towards the first of the Iconic landmarks, Cutty Sark. An impressive ship, but nowhere near as impressive as the crowds of people, 8-9 deep all cheering. The sound is deafening but really spurs everyone on giving a real good boost. Moving through the course and heading towards Tower Bridge. Another impressive sight, but not nearly as impressive as the brave BBC crew, stopping people to have a chat just before crossing the bridge.

The Halfway point hits so quick after and there are cheers from many runners as they go past and then know that the countdown to the finish is on.

Onto the Isle of dogs. Some impressive glass buildings that play merry hell with the Garmin and covering of the miles taking us up towards miles 16 and onwards.

Getting towards mile 20 and the lack of training is starting to have an impact. Legs feel heavy and the pace definitely slowed. By mile 22 someone had built a wall just in front of me and for the next 2 miles, getting going was really difficult. It became a bit of a run/walk from then. At mile 24, the crowds seemed to grow again, and the cheers got a bit louder. One foot in front of the other soon became a little quicker and something resembling a shuffling run started again.

Coming along the side of the Thames and rounding the corner past Big Ben was a welcome sight, knowing that there was just over a mile and a half to go to crossing the finish line. Heading towards the Mall, seeing Buckingham Palace gave everyone a boost. We all knew that just around the corner was the greatest sight any marathon runner can see…. The finish.

Having stood and watched on the finish straight in previous years, I thought that there was further to run than there actually was when we got round the final corner, but thankfully it wasn’t. Crossing the finish line was an amazing feeling. There were people all around smiling and laughing with each other giving each other a high five, laughing at people in costumes that beat us all.

Heading up the mall to collect my bag knowing that I had just finished this iconic marathon was a little bittersweet. It was an amazing race, so well managed and supported by the people of London that it feels a shame that so many people try year on year and never get to experience this event and it was also a shame that I didn’t put a beer in my kit bag, because I could have murdered one at the finish.

 

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